BE A PINOY AND EAT THESE 8 LOCAL FOOD

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(Source: wikimedia)

Pinoy is a local term given to another fellow Filipino. Ready to eat like a Pinoy when you travel to the Philippines?

One of the ASEAN countries known for as food haven is the Philippines.

Filipinos, like any other of their Asian counterparts, love food. Not just love, they adore it and it is part of their culture. They are very passionate when it come to this topic. The local cuisines have this kind of flavour that attract many travellers to try it out. In other word, the food is delicious. Here are the top spreads if you think you are a real traveller, and want to eat like a local.

(Source: southeastasiatraveladvice)
(Source: southeastasiatraveladvice)

Balut. This is the most famous dish among all. A popular street food, balut is a developing duck embryo that’s boiled and eaten in its shell. Some people think it is delicious and some really can’t take it. If you are a real traveller, stack up and be a Pinoy. Try it!

(Source: wikiwand)
(Source: wikiwand)

Crispy Pata. Do you want something that practically melts in your mouth? Then look no further than Crispy Pata. It actually consists of deep-fried pig trotters or knuckles served with a soy-vinegar dip. Give it a shot and you’ll love it.

(Source: fairfaxinnrestaurant)
(Source: fairfaxinnrestaurant)

Tapsilog. While Indonesian and Malaysian have their Bakso and Nasi Lemak respectively as the breakfast signature, Filipino also has their very own iconic dish for breakfast – Tapsilog. I had a garlic fried rice that served with a cured beef and egg. As for my friend, he had the same but instead of beef, he opted for a milkfish and pork combined.

(Source: seriouseats)
(Source: seriouseats)

Halo-Halo. Now this is a must when it comes to desserts. Mixed together, that is what Halo-Halo means. This lovely food consists of shaved ice and evaporated milk with a strings of ingredients like boiled kidney beans, garbanzos, sugar palm fruit, young coconut, and sweetened up with sugar, among many others. All these are parked in a tall glass, followed by the shaved ice which is then sprinkled over with sugar and topped with either leche flan, purple yam or ice cream. Lastly, the evaporated milk is then poured into the mixture before serving it. This is a sister food to Malaysian’s very own Air Batu Campur or ABC.

(Source: dishmaps)
(Source: dishmaps)

Adobo. One of the most known dish locally, Adobo is a popular dish made with chicken or pork marinated in vinegar, soy sauce, black peppercorn, garlic, and bay leaf. Some people says that this is the national kind of dish of the country.

(Source: Dhang)
(Source: Dhang)

Pork Sisig. It is made of chopped pig’s face, ears, and a generous amount of chicken liver. It’s usually seasoned with calamansi and chili peppers and is served sizzling on a cast iron plate. You can find this special dish almost everywhere in Manila.

(Source: recipeshubs)
(Source: recipeshubs)

Pancit Bihon Guisado. Now this is a Filipino-Chinese dish made with sauteed rice noodles, meat, and vegetables. It’s a staple second only to rice. There are several types of pancit, but this is one of the most common and can be found in many Filipino eateries.

(Source: Lorely)
(Source: Lorely)

Sinigang. Have you tried Malaysia’s Singgang or Thai’s Tom Yum. Sinigang is very similar to these. It is a soup or stew characterized by its sour and savory flavors. It’s traditionally tamarind-based and can be made with fish, pork, beef, shrimp, or chicken as the significant part of the ingredients.