6 MUST-EAT FOOD WHEN YOU’RE IN HONG KONG

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Whilst it is known as a top shopping haven in Asia, Hong Kong isn’t that shiny when it comes to food. Not many visitors realise that Hong Kong also offers a stunning arrays of delicacy that make food lovers spoilt for choices.

Kau Kee Beef Brisket
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Credit by: impulseonline.net

Probably one of the best beef brisket you can find in the world, the delicious, tender, slow cooked beef brisket cooked in a broth of spices, never fails to disappoint with long queue of eager devotees waiting to devour the legendary noodle. Make sure to order the curry tendon beef brisket, divinely rich curry sauce & tender beef brisket.
Source: Tommy Ooi Travel Guide

Australian Dairy Company

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Credit by: cits.com

One of locals favorite place for decent, delicious and affordable all day breakfast Hong Kong style. The fast paced movements of the waiters mean they expect you to keep up to them or risk being scold. This is definitely not the place for a cup of coffee to enjoy for the whole afternoon. Customers comes and leave quickly allowing the next customers to dine. It is common to share seating place with others when it is crowded. Food is served at unbelievable speed and accuracy. Once taking a bite of its fluffy scrambled egg along with the pillow soft inside & yet crispy at the outer toast, sipping Hong Kong Milk Tea and not to forget the creamy Custard Milk, all the negative sides are meant to be forgotten and that’s the reason of many loyal & returning customers.
Source: Tommy Ooi Travel Guide.

Chicken Hot Pot

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Source: Sam The Local.

You may have tried hot pot and visited the recently popular Drunken Pot, but have you ever had chicken hot pot. You start off with a whole or half chicken that finishes cooking at your table. It’s already been seasoned with some spices and herbs. You and your party eat the chicken first, and as you near the end you put in your order for the food you would like to hot pot, just as you would for regular hot pot, then you can ask the servers to add the broth into the pot the chicken was in with spicy or regular broth. Then you go about doing regular hot pot and cook your food in the pot!
Source: Sam The Local.

Leung Cha

Have you walked by some shops and noticed they had bowls of black liquid set out and wondering what people are standing around drinking? These are Chinese herbal teas. They can help if you are feeling sick, already sick, feeling a sore throat, or want to calm your yin/yang (hot/coolness in your body). There are some with many herbs that may taste bitter but have a sweet aftertaste. There are others that are simple and sweet made from flowers. Some of these shops also sell fresh sugarcane juice. And have you heard about sugarcane jelly?!
Source: Sam The Local.

Snake Soup

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Source: The Guardian.

Snake soup is considered a delicacy in the city, as traditionalists believe it wards off colds and other maladies. One of the best places to try it is Ser Wong Fun, which has a 115-year history of serving snake soups. The snake meat is shredded into thin white strips and served in a broth of mushrooms, seafood and lemon leaves. The place is a little shabby and always very packed but the experience is quintessentially Hong Kong.
Source: The Guardian.

Milk Tea

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Credit By:travel.cnn

Often described as the “founder of milk tea,” Lan Fong Yuen currently has two locations in the city. The original shop is still holding at Gage Street, where customers are frequently found sipping on their iced milk teas amid boxes and stock. Starting in the 1950s, founder Lum Muk Ho concocted milk tea by adapting the techniques used for Hainanese coffee. The tea goes through a nude-coloured sackcloth strainer into a copper teapot before being served either hot or cold. Here, the natural aromas of the tea are still very strong and can be enjoyed either with or without sugar. Lan Fong Yuen has also recently opened a larger branch in Tsim Sha Tsui.
Source: The Guardian.